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Faridah Zaman

Fellow and Tutor in History (Somerville); Associate Professor of the History of Britain and the World
BA MPhil PhD (Cantab)
Faculty of History

Faridah Zaman (Fellow in History)

Faridah Zaman is Associate Professor of the History of Britain and the World at the University of Oxford, and Tutor of Modern History at Somerville College.

After completing her PhD at the University of Cambridge, she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Chicago from 2015-2018.

Dr Zaman is a historian of the modern British Empire, South Asia and global intellectual history.

Currently, she has two main areas of research. The first is a study of Muslim political activists, religious scholars, journalists and poets in early twentieth century British India. She situates developments in the thought of these figures within a history of worldwide war, political revolution and imperial decline.

The second research area concerns history as an academic discipline in Britain from the late eighteenth century, and its relationship to the expansion and legitimisation of empire. To date, she has also written on memory and nostalgia, heritage and imperial visual culture and political visions of the future in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

 

Academic Biography:

2015-2018 Dorothy and Gaylord Donnelley Postdoctoral Research Scholar, University of Chicago

2010-2014 PhD in History, University of Cambridge

2009-2010 MPhil in Historical Studies, University of Cambridge

2006-2009 BA in History, University of Cambridge

Publications
  • The Young Muhammadans: Indian Muslims in a global age [MS in preparation]
  • ‘The Future of Islam, 1672-1924,’ Modern Intellectual History [forthcoming]
  • ‘Beyond Nostalgia: time and place in Indian Muslim politics,’ Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 27, 4 (2017), pp. 627-647.
  • ‘Revolutionary History and the Postcolonial Muslim: Re-writing the “Silk Letter Conspiracy” of 1916’, South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies, 39, 3 (2016), pp. 626-643.
  • ‘Colonizing the Sacred: Allahabad and the Company State, 1797–1857,’ Journal of Asian Studies, 74, 2 (2015), pp. 347–367.

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