Matthew Wood

Professorial Fellow; Professor of Neuroscience

Matthew Wood is Professor of Neuroscience and Associate Head of the Medical Sciences Division (http://www.medsci.ox.ac.uk/support-services/matthew-wood) in the University of Oxford. His laboratory is based in the Department of Paediatrics.

Matthew graduated in Medicine from the University of Cape Town in 1987, working in clinical Neuroscience before gaining a doctorate in Physiological Sciences from the University of Oxford in 1993. His research team works on developing gene therapies for degenerative disorders of the brain and muscles – so-called neuromuscular diseases. This is exemplified by landmark work using small DNA patches called oligonucleotides to correct the genetic abnormalities underlying the fatal childhood muscle disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Further information is available at Professor Wood’s page with the Oxford Neuroscience and Department of Paediatrics.

Publications

Delivery of siRNA to the mouse brain by systemic injection of targeted exosomes.
Journal article
Alvarez-Erviti L. et al, (2011), Nat Biotechnol, 29, 341 - 345

Targeting the 5' untranslated region of SMN2 as a therapeutic strategy for spinal muscular atrophy.
Journal article
Winkelsas AM. et al, (2021), Mol Ther Nucleic Acids, 23, 731 - 742
Immortalized Canine Dystrophic Myoblast Cell Lines for Development of Peptide-Conjugated Splice-

Switching Oligonucleotides.
Journal article
Tone Y. et al, (2021), Nucleic Acid Ther

Molecular correction of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by splice modulation and gene editing.
Journal article
Hanson B. et al, (2021), RNA Biol, 1 - 15

Molecular and electrophysiological features of spinocerebellar ataxia type seven in induced pluripotent stem cells.
Journal article
Burman RJ. et al, (2021), PLoS One, 16

Mesyl phosphoramidate backbone modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting miR-21 with enhanced in vivo therapeutic potency.
Journal article
Patutina OA. et al, (2020), Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 117, 32370 - 32379

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